Free Book Online
Book Death in Holy Orders (Adam Dalgliesh Mystery Series #11)

Pdf

Death in Holy Orders (Adam Dalgliesh Mystery Series #11)

3.4 (2308)

Log in to rate this item

    Available in PDF - DJVU Format | Death in Holy Orders (Adam Dalgliesh Mystery Series #11).pdf | Language: ENGLISH
    P. D. James(Author)

    Book details


The setting itself is elemental P. D. James: the bleak coast of East Anglia, where atop a sweep of low cliffs stands the small theological college of St. Anselm’s. On the shore not far away, smothered beneath a fall of sand, lies the body of one of the school’s young ordinands. He is the son of Sir Alred Treves, a hugely successful and flamboyant businessman who is accustomed to getting what he wants—and in this case what he wants is Commander Adam Dalgliesh to investigate his son’s death. Although there seems to be little to investigate, Dalgliesh agrees, largely out of nostal-gia for several happy summers he spent at St. Anselm’s as a boy. No sooner does he arrive, however, than the college is torn apart by a sacrilegious and horrifying murder, and Dalgliesh finds himself ineluctably drawn into the labyrinth of an intricate and violent mystery.

Here P. D. James once more demonstrates her unrivalled skill in building a classic detective story into a fully realized novel, gripping as much for its psychological and emotional richness as for the originality and complexity of its plotting—and, of course, for the horror and suspense at its heart. Filled with unforgettable characters, brilliant in its evocation of the East Anglian scene and the religious background against which the action takes place, Death in Holy Orders again offers proof, if proof were needed, that P. D. James is not only the reigning master of the crime novel but also, simply, one of the finest novelists writing today.

The setting itself is elemental P. D. James: the bleak coast of East Anglia, where atop a sweep of low cliffs stands the small theological college of St. Anselm’s. On the shore not far away, smothered beneath a fall of sand, lies the body of one of the school’s young ordinands. He is the son of Sir Alred Treves, a hugely successful and flamboyant businessman who is accustomed to getting what he wants—and in this case what he wants is Commander Adam Dalgliesh to investigate his son’s death. Although there seems to be little to investigate, Dalgliesh agrees, largely out of nostal-gia for several happy summers he spent at St. Anselm’s as a boy. No sooner does he arrive, however, than the college is torn apart by a sacrilegious and horrifying murder, and Dalgliesh finds himself ineluctably drawn into the labyrinth of an intricate and violent mystery. Here P. D. James once more demonstrates her unrivalled skill in building a classic detective story into a fully realized novel, gripping as much for its psychological and emotional richness as for the originality and complexity of its plotting—and, of course, for the horror and suspense at its heart. Filled with unforgettable characters, brilliant in its evocation of the East Anglian scene and the religious background against which the action takes place, Death in Holy Orders again offers proof, if proof were needed, that P. D. James is not only the reigning master of the crime novel but also, simply, one of the finest novelists writing today.

4.2 (10233)
  • Pdf

*An electronic version of a printed book that can be read on a computer or handheld device designed specifically for this purpose.

Formats for this Ebook

PDF
Required Software Any PDF Reader, Apple Preview
Supported Devices Windows PC/PocketPC, Mac OS, Linux OS, Apple iPhone/iPod Touch.
# of Devices Unlimited
Flowing Text / Pages Pages
Printable? Yes

Book details

  • PDF | 640 pages
  • P. D. James(Author)
  • Random House (April 2001)
  • English
  • 4
  • Mystery, Thriller & Suspense

Read online or download a free book: Death in Holy Orders (Adam Dalgliesh Mystery Series #11)

 

Review Text

  • By Mary Whipple on December 27, 2008

    This quintessentially British mystery, reminiscent in plot to some of those of Agatha Christie, tells an old-fashioned tale of murder and death with the murder and all the action taking place inside a closed community. One of the priests or ordinands within St. Anselm's, a small, remote, High Church seminary, is dead, and another appears to have committed a murder--or two, or three.In this 2001 mystery by P. D. James, Commander Adam Dalgliesh, who spent several summers at St. Anselm's as a boy, returns to investigate the death of the young son of an extremely wealthy man. In short order, additional deaths occur. A Rogier van der Weyden altarpiece, a treasure trove of ecclesiastical silver, Pre-Raphaelite paintings, and other priceless art objects owned by the about-to-be-closed seminary, provide a possible financial motive for murder, while an incestuous relationship, a secret marriage, a paralyzing fear of the future, and even pedophilia by a much-loved priest are among the psychological motives.Politeness and "civilized" behavior, despite the less-than-polite sexual perversions and fetishes of some of the characters, play a greater role here than they do in many, more "modern" mysteries. There is no graphic sex, no profanity, and no scenes of violence--just the effects of the violence. We see the priests and ordinands only within their circumscribed lives, and there are no scenes that suggest that any of them have any sense of humor--or any real fun.Although James conveys enough psychological astuteness that her characters do not feel flat, there are at least eight or ten people who could have committed the murder. Very substantial background information is given for each of these, slowing down the "action." The reader must follow all of them, along with an equally large number of red herrings, for four hundred pages before the plot is resolved, somewhat anticlimactically. This complexity, some of it unnecessary, combined with maddeningly detailed, physical descriptions of the rooms of the seminary, made this a four-star experience for me, rather than five-star. n Mary WhippleThe Private Patient (Adam Dalgliesh Mysteries)The Lighthouse (Adam Dalgliesh Mystery Series #13)The Murder Room (Adam Dalgliesh Mystery Series #12)The Skull Beneath the Skin (Cordelia Gray Mysteries, No. 2)An Unsuitable Job for a Woman (Cordelia Gray Mysteries, No. 1)

  • By Alice on December 10, 2012

    I hate to offer a negative review - but someone has to stand up and say something for children who have been sexually abused - particularly by clergy! It is amazing that anyone, seeing heartbreaking stories of sexual abuse of young people, would allow such an apologetic to be published. It will give Jerry Sandusky and the like something to read while in prison.In spite of a good tale, and vivid characters, I couldn't get beyond, (nor should anyone) the defense of child abuse, ("it was only fondling") and the vilification of someone who "dug up" more victims. The fact that the story is so well done makes it worse, in that it carries some legitimacy to the idea of abuse being minimal. The subtext of abuse was not primary to the story, but it was definitely central - you couldn't miss it. No one would permit a defense of racism or rape or any other illegal and immoral activities.Seriously, this needs to be addressed. At first I assumed it was revealing the context of the story, but when the main character immediately jumped to the defense of a pedophile, I was shocked and sickened. This story should be edited, updated, something.Publishers, please read the news, get some information from the young people who were "only fondled" and check your facts. I would wonder if this sort of defense is culpable in the continued abuse of children - it offers a way to spin the crime to make the perpetrators more sympathetic, and any accusers vilified. Shame!

  • By S. Warfield on June 5, 2013

    This is my second reading of "Death in Holy Orders" by P.D. James, and my favorite mystery of all time. The first aspect of this book that I love is the secluded, sinister atmosphere of the location where the story takes place. St. Anselm's theological college sits precariously on the cliffs off to itself on the coastline of East Anglia. There is nothing else around it, but a few small towns are within driving distance. St. Anselm's has been in existence since it was created by a wealthy woman in the 19th century, and has seen many wealthy ordinands go through to become Anglican priests in the High Church of England, which is the Anglo-Catholic Church.Commander Adam Dalgliesh of New Scotland Yard is called to look into the death of one of the students at St. Anselm's who was found buried under hundreds of pounds of sand from a cliff that had fallen down and covered him. The father of the dead student is not satisfied with the ruling of the death and wants an investigation into it. It is here that Dalgliesh enters the picture with his sharp investigative mind and critical thinking. His powers of observation are excellent as are his listening skills. Having some time off helps Dalgliesh to visit St. Anselm's, but not to vacation and relax as he had hoped to get away from London. Dalgliesh had spent happy summers at St. Anselm's as a boy and returning held nostalgia for him.The characters in the book are all very different and interesting. The priests who live and teach at the seminary are not all of one mind on a lot things, and motives for murder are many. As Dalgliesh goes about his interviews along with local police, more deaths occur, but no one has a strong idea for the motive at first. The priests and others who live at the college are afraid that a killer may be among them or that someone has entered from the outside and is killing off people at St. Anselm's. Priests and ordinands in long black cassocks scurry along the cloisters to safety in their rooms.This is one of several mysteries featuring Commander Adam Dalglish that P.D.James has written. James's characters are fully developed over the course of the book and the reader gets to know a lot of details about them and also the setting where the story takes place. St. Anselm's is very distinct in my mind as to the layout of the property and the viciousness of the weather along the coast that is slowly eroding.The solving of the cases in this book is not easy. It is written in such a way that one cannot guess early on who the perpetrator(s) might be. This is a multi-layered and fascinating story that is very well-written and is a bit unusual in its setting. It fascinated me the first time and the second time through was just as good.Highly recommended for literary crime readers and for mystery readers.


  • Name:
    Email*:
    The message text*: